Visiting scholar at Emory University, Atlanta US

Emory Campus - the main quad

Emory Campus – the main quad

I have been spending more than a month as a visiting scholar at Emory, invited by Professor Valérie Loichot and thanks to my Marie Curie fellowship. It has been an amazing experience! Emory is one of the best universities in the United States and it is such an exciting environment where to do research, meet other scholars and discuss with them about literature and philosophy. During this period, I have been attending many different conferences, museum guided tours, readings, theatre shows, talks and presentations (in French studies, Italian studies, gender studies, African cinema studies etc.) and I had the opportunity to meet other scholars and discuss about my work with such important academic personalities as Valérie Loichot, Geoffrey Bennington and Elissa Marder in the Department of French and Italian and in the Comparative Literature one. Emory University has really huge resources and equipment for research, and a very good library, too. I could work on my monograph, especially on a chapter that I am currently developing on Glissant, Nancy and Derrida on the subjects of community, hospitality, relation and the stranger. I have also made a public presentation (or ‘guest lecture’) of the first chapter of my book, that I have submitted as an article, too. The text I have presented and discussed at Emory is entitled ‘Le lieu tremblant du poème-monde chez Glissant et Heidegger’. It is about the complex relation between poetry and the place (glissantian ‘le lieu’, heidegger’s ‘ort’) and the conflictual-agonistic aesthetic that derives from it in both the German philosopher and the Martinican poet and philosopher. In particular, I have focused on the late Heidegger’s essays on language and poetry and on Glissant’s Soleil de la conscience (1956). The article has been well received by the audience and gave birth to very interesting discussions that are certainly going to influence my future work on this topic. During my stay, I have also applyed for many academic positions in the States and both Valérie and Michael Wiedorn helped me a lot in the application procedures (it’s a very hard job!). Well, fingers crossed! I have also assisted to a couple of Valérie’s courses in both English and French (to understand better how is teaching in the States) and I have also participated in some activities of the Italian ‘side’ of the department, especially with Simona Muratore (who also works on Italian migrant literature I am very interested in).

Emory is an exciting place to do research, but I have also received a great human welcome and met people that have deeply marked my intellectual journey. I would like to thank them all, even if I cannot quote all their names here. Everyone gave me great inputs that will deeply influence my future work and maybe push it in new directions that I hadn’t considered before (and this is what makes research a great thing and gives it its most authentic and creative sense, isn’t it?). The contacts I have established and developed here will be very useful for my career, but above all I hope that I could give my personal contribution to the development of this exciting intellectual community.

The Emory Library reading room

The Emory Library reading room

A trip at Sweetwater Creek, enjoying the fall colours.

A trip at Sweetwater Creek, enjoying the fall colours.

 

Advertisements

The atelier of Victor Anicet: a Martinican artist, painter and ceramist

During our research trip to Martinique, we had the great opportunity to meet Victor Anicet, a very important painter and ceramist, living in Shoelcher. He was a great friend and fellow of Édouard Glissant. They met in the sixties, sharing for over 40 years their political and cultural struggles for the independence and against the cultural and historical alienation of Martinique and the Caribbean. Glissant himself asked him to realise his grave, as a symbol of their friendship and “complicity in creation” (as Anicet himself told during the eulogy pronounced at his friend’s funerals in “Le Diamant” in 2010). Victor Anicet kindly and passionately showed us his atelier and his work, telling us the story of his development as an artist and explaining the origins and the aesthetic implications of his vision and art: the way in which he tries to elaborate the traces of the multiple and forgotten cultural pasts, artefacts and arts, of the creolizing Caribbean (starting from the Amerindians, and then the African slaves and the Indian labourers etc.), not only to recover a lost past, but to offer these troubling traces, this “field of turbulent ruins”, to the present day humanities of his island (this is what he calls a “poetics of Restitution”): “Ces ruines nous décalent par rapport à notre présent. Chaque adorno que nous voyons est une manière de cri. C’est une fenêtre, un passage dans d’autres mondes”. His task as an artist is to be a passeur (“quêteur d’ombres, quêteur de sens”), working in and producing the threshold between the past and the future of his community.

Victor Anicet in his atelier in Shoelcher

Victor Anicet in his atelier in Shoelcher

We also visited Glissant’s grave, realized by Anicet inside the impressive white cemetery in “Le Diamant”, just near the beach facing the stunning “Rocher du Diamant”, that has been inspiring Glissant’s writing for so many years. This is how the important scholar Valérie Loichot describes it in a recent and still unpublished article: “Glissant’s grave, in his flat and shallow horizontality, embraces the soil. When I first saw the grave, the lowliness – not in a submissive but in a welcoming sense – the integration in the environment through the easy erosion and fusion with stones and moss, and the mimetism in black and white with the surrounding graves struck me. It is in this humility, in a sense of closeness to the humus, that the grave invites the visitor to get closer to the earth, squatting or kneeling, and to pick up a handful of tiny seashells to arrange on the grave as a new sign” (“Édouard Glissant’s graves”, forthcoming in Callaloo. A Journal of African Diaspora Arts and Letters; see also, Naïma Hachad et Valérie Loichot, “Victor Anicet: le pays-Martinique; ou, Le bleau de la Restitution” in Small Axe 39, November 2012).

La tombe d’Édouard Glissant, réalisée par Victor Anicet au Diamant

La tombe d’Édouard Glissant, réalisée par Victor Anicet au Diamant

"Rien n'est vrai, tout est vivant" is the epitaph on Glissant's grave

“Rien n’est vrai, tout est vivant” is the epitaph on Glissant’s grave

I put here a very beautiful text, written by Victor Anicet for the International Conference on “Les arts amérindiens et l’art contemporain” in 1997. The text (that the author has very kindly sent to me) is entitled “Restitution” and is a wonderful introduction to his work and artistic vision.

Victor Anicet

RESTITUTION

“J’ai donné un nom à chacune d’elles” écrit Christophe COLOMB dans son journal de bord, parlant des Antilles.

Peut-on à l’instar de COLOMB, renommer les choses, les classer selon notre propre vision du monde ? Peut-on parler d’Art Amérindien, de création artistique amérindienne ?

Quelle est la part de l’artiste contemporain vivant dans nos sociétés où volontairement des pans de notre histoire ont été occultés, tronqués ?

Rappelons nous cette citation d’Eduardo GALEANO “Pour que quelque chose n’existe pas, il suffit de décréter sa non-existence”

The atelier of Victor Anicet (1)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (1)

Il me semble que l’on ne saurait parler, abordant la culture amérindienne, d’art de la Caraïbe plurielle ; mais que de talent, d’habilité manuelle, si nous considérons comme KANT, que le beau doit être distingué de l’utile, que l’œuvre d’art est une beauté libre, celle qui n’est astreinte à aucune fonction qu’au beau lui même.

En effet, ce que nous reconnaissons comme œuvres d’art de la culture amérindienne, n’ont pas été produites en tant que telles. Elles sont la coïncidence du beau et de l’utile, ce que l’auteur précité appelle la beauté adhérente ; c’est à dire la beauté d’un objet soumis à d’autres critères que le jugement esthétique.

Les intentions qui étaient à l’origine des objets furent très diverses : fonctions utilitaires, religieuse ou mythique, intention didactique, support de la mémoire collective, besoin de conjurer les forces extérieures ; car ces peuples en modelant, façonnant des objets utilitaires étaient-ils à la recherche d’une esthétique ? Ne disaient-ils pas plutôt leur manière d’être au monde ?

Ils ont laissé derrière eux un champ de ruines turbulentes – turbulentes parce qu’elles ne cessent de nous troubler, nous interpeller, nous dé-caler, je parle ici, bien sûr, de la notion de temps.

The atelier of Victor Anicet (2)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (2)

Ces ruines nous décalent par rapport à notre présent. Chaque adorno que nous voyons est une manière de cri. C’est une fenêtre, un passage dans d’autres mondes.

Et c’est au profane, à l’artiste de se métamorphoser, non pas en chaman, mais de se faire quêteur d’ombres, quêteur de sens.

C’est à l’artiste contemporain de pratiquer les rites de passages .La chaîne tragique a été rompue, la fonction de l’artiste est le dévoilement de cet inaperçu ; car l’île est un réservoir de secrets.

Sur nos terres traquées, nous sommes des déportés – le peuple d’AVANT (Amérindien, Caraïbe, Taïnos, Caribe … comme il vous plaira de le nommer) – est lui aussi, sans aucun doute, un peuple de déportés.

Depuis la forêt amazonienne, verticale d’ombres, ils ont déplacé leur horizon au niveau de l’eau, à l’horizontale donc, et ont franchi à bord de gommiers, l’océan pour essaimer nos îles.

Un ouvrage de la série des trays

Un ouvrage de la série des trays

Il n’y eut plus alors les grands bois, les oiseaux et le vent. La terre ne bougeait plus de la même façon. Leurs poteries portent les traces de cette nouvelle dimension. Nos îles ont sans doute constitué de nouveaux espaces-temps pour ce peuple de l’AVANT.

Quelles odeurs, quelles épices ont-ils emportés dans leurs gommiers qui butaient sur le fracas des montagnes d’eau, Quelles images ont-ils gardé du silence de leurs grands bois, de leur paysage ?

Et moi un adorno à la main , je voudrais reconnaître – connaître et appréhender. Avoir la clé ; mais ma quête est vaine et dérisoire. Moi, l’artiste, le producteur d’images, je suis au seuil des mondes et je voudrais être le témoin du passage : un passeur. Restituer, non pas reconstituer. Restituer au plus grand nombre de Martiniquais les traces que j’ai cru avoir décelées.

Il y a des lignes à relier, des points à marquer, il y a tant de mondes à explorer dans nos îles. L’artiste doit redistribuer, en de nouvelles donnes, cet héritage d’ombres et de fracas que beaucoup ne connaissent, sauf ceux qui fréquentent les musées. Amener une prise de conscience des jeunes, les inciter à retourner aux sources, rechercher ce qu’il y a de valorisant dans les civilisations des peuples de l’AVANT.

Des dessins réalisés dans la forêt

Des dessins réalisés dans la forêt

Connaître tous les éléments ( ou composants ) du métissage de ce peuple créole : caraïbe, africain, indien, chinois, européen et leur interpénétration dans notre vécu actuel.

Il faut reconstituer la voile brisée. Tâche gigantesque mais empreinte d’humilité.

Leurs dieux ne sont pas morts, les signes peuvent être rechargés de nos propres espérances, de notre propre tragique.

“Nos barques sont ouvertes pour tous nous les naviguons”. Edouard. GLISSANT

Empruntons à notre tour les gommiers, hissons la voile mosaïque et allons à la découverte de nos mondes.

The atelier of Victor Anicet (4)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (4)

An essay for Glissan's grave symbol

An essay for Glissan’s grave symbol

The atelier of Victor Anicet (5)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (5)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (6)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (6)

Accouplement (by V. Anicet)

J’ai voulu recréer l’ambiance qui existait au moment des rapports sexuels dans la période esclavagiste.

On sait que les esclaves refusaient d’avoir des enfants pour qu’ils ne connaissent pas le même sort qu’eux et souvent préféraient tuer leurs bébés.

Aussi les maîtres, désireux d’accroître le nombre d’esclaves, surveillaient l’accouplement, ce qui explique la présence d’un troisième personnage.

La série des Trays

La série des Trays

Le Tray (by V. Anicet)

Je découvre le tray sur l’habitation Dehaumont au Marigot, cet objet m’a fasciné car il servait à la fois, de support pour le jeu de serbi des ouvriers agricoles qui s’adonnaient à leur passe-temps favori dès que la paie de la semaine avait été servie, de berceau pour les bébés, de récipient pour transporter le linge des lavandières ou des pierres nécessaires à l’édification de la maison du maître.

On le retrouve devant le cinéma débordant de bonbons et de pistaches.

Le tray voyage dans le temps et l’espace de notre Caraïbe

Quand on sait que le tray est un objet sacré pour les Indiens et qu’il est utilisé au moment des cérémonies rituelles pour présenter les offrandes aux déesses telle que Siva ou Kali et qu’il a été détourné de sa fonction initiale par les anciens esclaves.

Aussi, je peuple le tray d’adornos , petites poteries qui ressemblent à des masques. Ces masques sont posés sur des tissus africains afin de rappeler le métissage de notre peuple.

The atelier of Victor Anicet (6)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (7)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (8)

The atelier of Victor Anicet (8)

Le cimetière du Diamant

Le cimetière du Diamant

La maison de Glissant au Diamant

La maison de Glissant au Diamant

Séjour de recherche en Martinique

Je viens de rentrer d’un très beau séjour de recherche en Martinique, avec ma collègue Louise Hardwick, du 8 au 21 avril. C’est mon troisième voyage dans cette île magnifique des Caraïbes et désormais je peux dire de la connaître de mieux en mieux. Cette fois-ci, nous avons séjourné à Schoelcher, une commune tout près de Fort-de-France, juste au nord sur la côte Caraïbe. Nous avons loué une voiture et cela nous a permis de nous déplacer tranquillement, soit vers Fort-de-France soit vers le Nord et le Sud de l’île. Ça a été un voyage intense et plein de visites et de rencontres humainement et intellectuellement enrichissants (deux aspects de la « recherche » qui ne devraient jamais être séparés). Nous nous sommes rendus plusieurs fois à la Bibliothèque Schoelcher à Fort-de-France (un magnifique bâtiment en style art nouveau, exposé à Paris et ensuite déplacé en Martinique, ouvert en 1893). Nous avons visité aussi le très joli Écomusée de la Martinique à l’Anse Figuier (où il y a en ce moment une importante exposition sur Joseph Zobel), le Musée Régional d’Histoire et d’Ethnographie et les Archives Départementales.

Bibliothèque Schoelcher à Fort-de-France

Bibliothèque Schoelcher à Fort-de-France

On a aussi profité des beautés de ce pays fascinant: pas seulement de ses plages magnifiques et tellement différentes (de la baie du Diamant, aux plages noires du nord à l’eau cristalline et calme de l’Anse Figuier), mais aussi de ses petits villages (Les Anses d’Arlet, Saint-Pierre, Tartane, Carbet, Rivière Pilote, Gros Morne, Fonds-Saint-Denis etc.), de ses routes qui traversent la forêt tropicale, comme la Route de la Trace, de sa capitale créole Fort-de-France, avec ses belles librairies (comme l’ancienne Librairie Alexandre, où nous avons acheté des livres sur la littérature et l’histoire antillaise, qu’on a parfois du mal à trouver ailleurs), ses églises, ses marchés, ses quartiers populaires, comme Texaco et Trenelle, et la Place de la Savane, qui vient d’être réaménagée. Nous avons aussi visité le campus de l’UAG à Schoelcher et le nouveau Campus Caribéen des Arts, qu’on vient d’ouvrir à Lamentin.

Moi avec Saint-Pierre et la Montagne Pelée, vus de la Vierge des Marins

Moi avec Saint-Pierre et la Montagne Pelée, vus de la Vierge des Marins

Mais surtout, on a fait des rencontres très intéressants pour nos recherches : avec un journaliste, traducteur et écrivain comme Rodolf Etienne (notamment traducteur en créole de “Les Indes” de Glissant et de “La tragédie du Roi Christophe” de Césaire et avec lequel nous avons fait un entretien à propos de ses traductions et de ses idées sur la pan-créolité). Nous avons rencontré aussi deux grands amis d’Édouard Glissant, comme le chercheur et écrivain Manuel Norvat, qui vient de soutenir une thèse de doctorat sur l’œuvre de Glissant à Paris III, et le céramiste-sculpteur Victor Anicet, dont l’œuvre s’est beaucoup inspirée de la longue amitié avec son compagnon, commencée dans les années ’60. Il nous a expliqué tout cela lors d’une visite de son atelier, pendant laquelle il nous a montré son travaille artistique et raconté son engagement culturel et politique. Nous avons visité l’espace Foudres d’Édouard Glissant, dédié à l’écrivain par son ami José Hayot à l’Habitation Saint Etienne (HSE). Nous avons aussi été interviewés par Rodolf Etienne pour la page culturelle de France-Antilles, le quotidien le plus important de l’île. C’étaient des rencontres intéressants, avec des personnes généreuses, soit sur le plan humain que sur le plan intellectuel, et qui nous ont beaucoup appris sur la littérature, l’art et la culture martiniquaises et créoles.

Espace "Les Foudres Édouard Glissant" à HSE

Espace “Les Foudres Édouard Glissant” à HSE

Un moment particulièrement émouvant a été pour moi la visite de la tombe de Glissant, réalisée par Anicet lui-même au cimetière du Diamant : il s’agit d’un lieu chargé d’une énergie formidable, coincé entre les maisons du petit village et une de plus belles plages de monde, balayée de vents et de houles très puissants, dont les quatre kilomètres de sable blanche et noire aboutissent au promontoire de la « femme couchée » et à l’îlot volcanique du Diamant. Pas loin de la tombe de Glissant, il y a d’un coté sa maison, où j’avais déjà été avec lui en 2009 lors du Prix Carbet, et de l’autre côté, juste au-dessous du Morne Larcher, l’étonnant monument du Cap 110, dédié aux esclaves morts ensuite au naufrage d’un bateau négrier dans cette baie. J’espère que mes images pourront mieux raconter ce formidable voyage, sur lequel je reviendrai avec plus de détails dans les prochains jours …

Monument du Cap 110 - Anse Cafard

Monument du Cap 110 – Anse Cafard

La tombe d’Édouard Glissant, réalisée par Victor Anicet au Diamant

La tombe d’Édouard Glissant, réalisée par Victor Anicet au Diamant